Category: Voice of an FCNI Staff

Investing in my Kids

Why I Foster
by
Daniel Carlisle, FCNI Supervisor
May, 23, 2017 -

One of the most frequent concerns I hear from parents who are considering foster care or adoption is, “Will it be too hard on my kids?” There is certainly a fear of the unknown of how bringing a foster or adopted child into your lives will impact your current family. It is safe to say that adding a new family member to any family will change its current dynamics. This change is true if you add a new biological sibling, have a grandparent move in, remarry after divorce, or open your home to a foster or adoptive child.

Families are not static; they change frequently regardless of how much we wish we could keep them the same.

Home Studies

A Tool for Self-Discovery and Success
by
Bekah Alexander, FCNI Social Worker
May, 16, 2017 -

Many of us have a desire to open our lives to children in need of love and safety. It’s fun to dream of throwing open your front door to welcome an adorable foster child into the home. But becoming a Resource Parent is actually an intensive process that requires background checks, training, references, a home inspection, and what seems like an endless stack of paperwork. There are a lot of hoops to jump through before a child ends up on your doorstep. For many applicants, the most intimidating aspect of becoming a Resource Parent is the dreaded home study-- a comprehensive, written evaluation of the applicant’s strengths and issues. I know firsthand the scrutiny of inviting a stranger into my home to write about my life. Before I started writing home studies as a Social Worker, I was a foster parent! I’ve undergone five (FIVE!) home studies as a foster and adoptive parent in Indiana and California.

Shared Moments

Volunteering Goes Both Ways
by
Sarah Davenport, FCNI Staff
April, 19, 2017 -

Our volunteers are not only appreciated, they are critical to our work. As a Community-Based Organization, our agency is heavily embedded in our community, just as our community is embedded in us—we must mutually serve and respond to one another’s needs. Caring for local children, youth and families means that we need a variety of people to carry out an assortment of important positions, including mentoring and tutoring, as well as volunteering at events, in our office or to meet a family’s needs. Without a team of people pulling together, contributing their time, talents and compassion to our mission, we could not execute a program, meet a single need, change one life, or empower one person to reach their goals, let alone the over 1800 lives we impact annually. Our community of volunteers are vital to us achieving our mission year in and year out

The Balancing Act

Loving Others Well
by
Brooke Cone, FCNI Social Worker
April, 11, 2017 -

Self-centeredness is the enemy of love which is why therapists try to teach empathy and attunement to couples, parents and kids. When one can put oneself in another person’s shoes, then many of the walls which may have grown up between them can start to lower. Afterall, isn’t that the beauty and the risk of love--being willing to put someone else’s wellbeing ahead of your own?

My Path to Giving Back

A Social Worker’s Journey
by
Irianna Lembo, FCNI Social Worker
March, 21, 2017 -

Every one of our Social Workers has a personal journey which led them to their current roles--to their honorable profession of serving our community’s most vulnerable children and families. Below, one of our newest Social Workers, Irianna, shares her journey to FCNI and how her childhood influenced her future career path.  

Reflections on Social Work from Social Workers

by
Sarah Davenport, FCNI Staff
March, 14, 2017 -

An average day for a Social Worker is hardly ever average. As with most human-centered professions, the unexpected is expected and challenges come from all directions. It certainly isn’t a job for everyone. But unlike the vast majority of careers, Social Workers are privy to moments of immense joy that can be breath-taking; moments where they get to see, first hand, light re-emerge from darkness, and healing blossom across heartbreak. While social work isn’t for everyone, for those who’ve dedicated their lives to it, these moments are what make everything else worthwhile.

In celebration of this vital and profound profession, and the real people behind the title, we want to share some honest reflections from our Social Workers--sharing why they love the work that they do day in and day out.

To Dream Again

Igniting the Flame of Resiliency
by
Erin Voss, FCNI Therapist
February, 15, 2017 -

As is often the case, when something new comes along, something else typically gets displaced or overshadowed. The positive transition to emphasizing trauma-informed care and trauma-informed practices with children in foster care has had the unfortunate result of reducing the conversation on resiliency. While trauma-informed care has been a valuable shift in this field, it cannot and was not meant to standalone.

Positivity at Play

A Husband’s New Challenge
by
Daniel Carlisle, FCNI Therapist & Social Worker
February, 6, 2017 -

Every Thursday I meet with a group of men who all encourage each other to be better. Better husbands, fathers and people in general. Last February, one of the guys came to the group with a challenge for himself and the rest of us. The challenge was to buy a journal and then every day for a year write one thing that you love or admire about your wife or children or other significant person in your life. I accepted this challenge and the end product will be given to my wife on Valentine’s Day 2017.

That’s Amore

Our Community’s Creative Answer to Supporting Our Mission
by
Candace Miller, FCNI CRD Coordinator
January, 18, 2017 -

Last year, we began a partnership with the creative minds behind Zest it Up, a local catering and event planning company. Owners, Chanda Brown and Samantha Nason, came to us in early 2016 with the idea of putting on a series of pop-up dinners to not only help up raise funds, but to also raise community awareness and exposure to the work and heart behind our mission. The idea to accomplish this by hosting pop-up dinners stemmed from the popularity of popping up a restaurant for one night only in a unique location, something done in larger cities but not yet done with any regularity in San Luis Obispo County. These dinners would be a creative way to connect our community with us like never before, Zest it Up explaining, “Community is contagious and the strength that comes from it is boundless. This strength is the kind that lifts up those who struggle and knits them more intricately into the fabric of our community. Those without a voice, are given a voice.” By creating a series of fundraising events for us, Zest it Up were also able to achieve their goal to “dive deeper and call more people out to connect and support FCNI.”

Lesson in Generosity

Christmas at FCNI
by
Daniel Carlisle, FCNI Social Worker
December, 13, 2016 -

This holiday season, I will be celebrating my 43rd Christmas. In this time, I have made many holiday memories--some good, some not so good, and some which are still very funny. After all these Christmases, I have one particular memory which sticks out in my mind, and it involved “Santa’s Workshop”. No, I didn’t grow up in the North Pole, but I did grown up in Texas. And every year at my elementary school before school ended for the winter break, the stage in our cafeteria would be transformed into “Santa’s Workshop.” When I say “transformed,” I mean folding tables were set up in rows and a variety of family-satisfying gifts were put out on the tables. Gifts such as coffee mugs displaying slogans like “World’s Best Dad”, ceramic figurines of all sorts, neck ties, aprons, and, yes, even ashtrays (remember, this was over 30 years ago) lined the tables for students to peruse and purchase for different family members as gifts for the holidays. Every year, as I stood on the wooden steps leading to “Santa’s Workshop,” my anxiety would rise in hopes that the children in front of me would not buy the last pet rock which I knew my dad wanted more than anything. As I retell this memory, I am somewhat surprised at how a humble school fundraiser contributed so greatly to the development of my character as an adult and father. “Santa’s Workshop” helped to form generosity within me. It was the first time in my life that I remember thinking about other people and what they would like or need as a gift. This kind of generosity is a character trait that I strive to instill in my own children to this day.

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